Category Archives: last name L

John Lyle

The Equinox Bug hit me hard in 1985 when I moved from a small rural Yukon River village to the big city of Fairbanks. It was at running races that I met Corky Hebard, Stan Justice, Bob Murphy and several others who encouraged and inspired me to give the marathon a try. In the past 25 years I’ve participated about a dozen times and I must admit I enjoyed the ultra the most. For me it’s more a spiritual pilgrimage than a race…the awesome setting and transitional time of year; the camaraderie of runners regardless of ability or performance; several hundred participants starting in one chaotic bunch, panting and plodding up that steep sledding hill; catching your breath and finding a comfortable pace as you funnel into narrow forested trails. The Equinox has often been billed as one of the toughest marathons in North America. That may well be, yet regardless of the physical toughness of it, I think it’s got to be one of the most moving, inspirational marathons anywhere.

For me the Equinox is also one of the most humbling races I’ve run. I’ve made the mistake of going out too fast, only to have a sobering reckoning with reality at the base of Ester Dome. The steep downhills have also been tough on my ankles and knees. I love the uphill but the downhill really tears me up, so I typically take baby steps down. The power line along Gold Hill and on to the finish has always been a powerful time for me emotionally, especially with the ultra. I often move into an altered state, back and forth between bliss and pain. Most of all while running the Equinox, I’m filled with powerful memories of times with friends and family which always seems to pull me along through the tough parts like a bungee cord.

I suppose I’ve been training for the Equinox since I was four years old, though I didn’t realize it at the time. My mother had stories about me running barefoot as a young child in SE Texas in +100 degree heat for extended periods of time. She worried and took me to a child psychiatrist for an examination, fearful I was terribly deranged. As the story goes, the doctor returned me to my mother and said, “The boy likes to run. Let him run”. Bless his heart. The doctor was spot on. As a kid in school, I was easily distracted and couldn’t keep still. I loved sports but being quite small I was trampled. It soon became more clear that the thing I could do well, and really love was to run.  It seemed the meditative, rhythmic pace and breathing calmed and comforted me. Running made me feel good about myself and the world. I found that running as part of a team made it all the more rewarding. And running the Equinox along with such a good-natured, extended family of runners–aided and cheered on by an even larger extended family of supporters–is about as good as it gets.

In the mid 80’s I was a very competitive runner but starting in 1987 I’ve been dealing with one major injury after another, unfortunately missing more Equinox Marathons than I’ve run. In the last 10 years I’ve felt blessed to be able to just enter the race, regardless of whether or not I’m able to finish it. Given the state of my knees, it’s not a sure thing if I’ll run another Equinox. But I’ve always realized, even as a little kid running barefoot in Texas, that running was a blissful, sacred thing and not to be taken for granted. This year I had another knee surgery the day before the Equinox. When I watched the seemingly endless stream of runners from the window by the bed I was so happy for them all, doing this incredible thing together on such a beautiful day.

In many places people run on  busy roads but we’re really spoiled here in Fairbanks with such an incredible variety of trail systems on which to run, ski, bike, walk or snowshoe. Fairbanks also has a huge number of runners (and bikers, skiers, etc) for a small city its size. Most people are able to train on the Equinox course which is great. We learn our challenging places, our dark places, where we shine and where we hurt bad. And we make peace with the hills, knowing we play by their rules.

I’ve run several marathons and ultras in Hawai’i and unfortunately most are not run on terrain anywhere as diverse or pristine as the Equinox. Two exceptions are the Hilo-Volcano Ultra, starting at sea level and climbing to 4,200’ elevation, and the Volcano Wilderness Marathon which, like the Equinox, is largely off-road and quite diverse in terrain. But honestly, there’s something very special about the Equinox. Whether one’s an elite marathoner or a casual jogger/hiker, it’s an event which brings out the best in people regardless of how fast or far they go.

My advice to runners is pretty simple. As my old mentor Richard Frazier use to say: “Start off slow, then ease way back”. It’s easy to start too fast, then realize the tank’s half empty before the big climb begins. There’s more than enough time to make up at the end. Unfortunately, I’m very familiar with over training and running on legs that haven’t fully recovered, which makes it a bit of a slog. I guess I’d say that for me training begins the day after Equinox and continues to the start of the next race. Lots of hill work, cross training and hiking have helped me. And yoga has been a wonderful thing to incorporate… my wife, Susanne points out that I could always do much more of that.

As time passes I’m all the more in awe of the record times that individuals have set in this race. Susan Faulkner’s 3:18 and Stan Justice’s 2:41 are both phenomenal. Hot shot relay teams are hard pressed to beat these record times. And all the runners right on their heels shows what a historically talented community of runners we have right here in Fairbanks. It’s true in Fairbanks and it’s true almost anywhere you go: if you want to connect with engaged, happy, talented people, show up at a running event. The rest will be history.


Teri Langton

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you participated in the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra?  How many times?

This is my first relay (first leg) I’ve ever done, and the first time I’ve participated in the Equinox. My best time in my practice runs was two hours 12 minutes. and I was hoping to do it under two hours   I did it in 1:58!!

When do you start training for this race?  How much of the course itself do you incorporate into your training?  How often do you incorporate the Dome into your training?

I trained during the summer. I had six weeks where I couldn’t train due to a little injury, but after that I trained pretty hard.  I did Ester Dome two or three times and decided that I didn’t want to do that leg.  I did the chute, and decided that I didn’t want to do that leg either.  I wanted to the first leg, and it was a good fit for all of us team members.

What are your key workouts in preparation for this race?

I did a lot of running.  Even though I didn’t do the 2nd leg, I think running the Dome helped me a lot.  I also worked out in the Rec Center.

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

It’s such a community event.  People don’t care if it takes you four hours to do one leg.  They’re just so encouraging, and there are so many inspiring people out there who say, “good job” while you’re dying!

What’s your favorite part of the course? Your least favorite part?

I think the chute is really hard, but it’s all hard.  Even with the first part, there are so many roots that you really have to concentrate.  And then of course, the Dome is hard.   Running in the woods is my favorite part.

Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race. Describe the worst.

When I got to mile 5 and knew that I could make my goal… That was awesome!  No bad moments today!

Do you consider yourself a competitive runner? What are your running goals/fitness goals?

I’m not a competitive runner.  I’m slow.  I used to be able to do a 9:45 minute/mile.  I haven’t been able to do that for a year and a half, but I would like to get back to doing a 9:30 minute/mile. I’d like to lose another 10 pounds, and I think that would help me to reach my running goals.

What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

Get out and try it!  The training runs were wonderful.  The people are wonderful, and no one cares how fast you do it.

Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in this race?

Doing more hills would have helped.

Any plans on participating in the Equinox this year? This race has been described as one of the most grueling marathons in the country!  What keeps you motivated to participate in this event?

I think so!  I don’t know if I’ll do the whole thing, but I was thinking of maybe trying two legs.

Meeting my goal has really motivated me!

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Dana Novak


Susanne Lyle

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you completed the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra?  How many times?

I’ve run this marathon three times, I believe. In the last couple years I’ve really enjoyed running as part of a team on the relay.

What does your training schedule look like to prepare for this event? When do you start training? How often do you run on the course, the trails, and the Dome?

To be honest, I’ve never trained for any of the marathons I’ve run.  Although I try to maintain a good base by staying active with running, swimming and biking, I have never even looked at a training schedule.  In fact, my husband John always says that I could “do so much better” if I were more serious about training.  For some reason I’ve never had that kind of ambition.  I usually wait until the last minute before signing up, depending on how I feel.  

The closest I’ve gotten to a training regime is participating in the women’s running group with Bruce Miller and Steve Bainbridge’s Equinox training runs.  I’m not disciplined enough to do interval or hill training by myself.  Every year is different and I’ve been traveling quite a bit in the summers, so unfortunately I don’t get to attend these training runs religiously.  I’m lucky to live right on the Equinox trail and I run on it a lot, either connecting onto campus trails or roads up and around Ester Dome.  I hardly do any running on roads and feel grateful for all the great trails we have in Fairbanks.

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

It’s such a community event.  Whether you race, jog, or walk, hike, volunteer or cheer on the sidelines, it’s always felt to me as if the whole community is out to support each other.  It brings people together and celebrates everyone’s capabilities, efforts and accomplishments equally as we collectively appreciate the beautiful surroundings in which we live.

What’s your favorite part of the course?  Your least favorite part?

This relates mostly to the degree of difficulty.  It’s sometimes hard to remind yourself why you’re doing this when the alarm clock goes off early in the morning and you know it’s dark and chilly out and really, you’d much rather stay in your warm, comfortable bed. Then there’s the anxiety of not knowing what your race is going to be like.  I’m happy to get the first steep hill at the SRC behind me because it’s such a bottle neck, but once I find my pace and stride, I shift into the moment-by-moment, one-step-at-a-time mode.  Of course I dread the steep up-hill sections, but each Equinox is different and the same course section can feel easy one time and then really hard another.  I like the section where the trail meets Henderson Road.  Naturally, crossing the finish line is one of the best parts because you get to see all the smiling faces and cheer on the ones yet to cross…plus there is always the sauna afterwards.

Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race.  Describe the worst.

I’ve been lucky to have never experienced “hitting the wall” or injuring myself during the run but again, I don’t “race”.  I’m happy if I can just go the distance.  I’ve always been challenged staying warm and look forward to many cups of hot tea from the thermos during the race.  Psychologically one of the best moments is always reaching the top of Ester Dome and enjoying the view from up there.  It’s a great reminder what a magnificent place we live in, and a relief that the toughest (meaning up-hill) part of the race is over.

Do you consider yourself a competitive runner?  What are your running goals/fitness goals?

Like most runners know,  running a marathon is very humbling.  I lack the ambition to be competitive and besides staying healthy into old age, I never really had a “goal”.  If I know for myself that I did the best I could out there that day, I’m satisfied.  Running is only part of the activities I enjoy.  My first love is yoga and running is secondary.  It’s my yoga practice that has allowed me to continue running as much as I do in the first place.  Personally, I’ve found cross training to be beneficial.  I tend to alternate running and swimming days, once in a while combining both for a double workout or throwing in a bike ride.  In the winter I switch to cross country skiing.  

As I’ve gotten older I’ve learned to appreciate being able to run no matter how far or slow.  I don’t take my body for granted and try to take care of it by finding the balance between keeping fit and allowing it to rest.  My long-term goal is to be able to keep running as long as possible.  For me, that can sometimes mean running less (and doing more yoga) in the short term. 

What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

We only have this one body and the better we care for it the more we’re able to enjoy life.  It is a skill to stay tuned-in to your body at all times and know what it really needs.  I’m sure every runner has over trained or pushed themselves too much, too far or too fast at some point and then paid the precious price.   Yoga teaches to give 100 percent and then let go of the outcome.  I think running is a little like that:  we can prepare for the course as best we can but we never really know what will unfold on race day.  We can’t control all the factors.  There are too many. The only thing we can really control is our attitude.  So my advice would be to not take one’s self too seriously and remember to have fun. Enjoy yourself. Pause and notice the smell of the cranberries and soak in the fall colors. Most importantly:  smile, greet and thank those who pass by.

Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in the Equinox?

I’ve never really worried about training by the book.  If anything I could have probably put in more training miles, fueled more smartly, as well as allowed for more rest days prior to race day.

Any plans on participating in the Equinox this year?  Why do you participate in this event and what keeps you motivated?

Never say never.  The marathon distance is kind of hard on my body and at this point in my life,  not what I personally need.  But I’ll definitely consider the relay any year and would love it if the Equinox race would offer a half-marathon distance option.


David Leonard

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you participated in the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra?  How many times?

I’ve done the relay three or four times, and the whole Equinox four or five times.  I’ve never done the ultra, and I don’t intend to.  

When do you start training for this race?  How much of the course itself do you incorporate into your training?  How often do you incorporate the Dome into your training?

Training for this race is year round.  I don’t really have a start time.  It’s at least a year in advance and running continuously.  I incorporate the trail a lot.  It takes away a lot of the surprises and you get used to the course – where the turns are, where the roots are.  

What are your key workouts in preparation for this race?

The run we just did today, running up and back down Ester Dome from Ann’s Greenhouse.  I think this is the most important workout for this race because that’s the hardest part of the race.  I think this has the greatest fear factor; the apprehension as you approach it, and you’re thinking, oh my gosh, I have to run up that steep hill.  So I do it regularly so it becomes routine and it becomes no big deal.

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

You’re on the trail; you’re outside.  You stay in good shape.  The people who help you out and man the aid stations.  The fall day, the smells, the leaves.  It’s just a nice, scenic race. I hope it stays on the trails as much as possible in the future.  It’s being pushed out more and more on the roads.  And then absolutely, the finish! I don’t have to do it anymore!  The week after I don’t have to train; I don’t have to run.

What’s your favorite part of the course? Your least favorite part?

My favorite part?  As soon as I think of one, I think of another… I guess the section after the chute, down towards Henderson Road.  Partly because you know you’re almost done, and it’s also before you hit the wall of Gold Hill Road.  The out and back is my least favorite.  It’s too rocky, too rough.  I don’t like stumbling all over those boulders.

Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race. Describe the worst.

My horrible moment would be the first time I ever ran it when I hit that Gold Hill wall and totally blew up.  It was the most painful thing I’ve ever done and I still had six miles to go.  

Best moment?  I was running that section just after the chute.  My wife had come out to see me run and take my picture.  It was my fastest race and I felt pretty good.  As I came around the corner, my wife said, “What a guy!”

Do you consider yourself a competitive runner? What are your running goals/fitness goals?

Oh yeah.  I guess just to keep running.  I like to run.  I still have that six year old feeling of running.  Swinging my legs, pumping my arms, and running.  I just like to run, and I hope that I can continue that.

What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

You have to run continuously, and you have to get in long runs.  If you can’t go out and run eight miles just for fun, then you shouldn’t do this race.  Run up Ester Dome 10 times at least.  

Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in this race?

The only time I made a mistake was when I thought I made a mistake!  No, I can’t think of any.

Any plans on participating in the Equinox this year? This race has been described as one of the most grueling marathons in the country!  What keeps you motivated to participate in this event?

No, I haven’t been running enough.  I’m done with the relays.  To me, it’s like eating half a piece of cake.  You got to do the whole thing.  

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Liisa Luick

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you participated in the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra?  How many times? 

I think I participated in the relay portion about 3 times, 2 that I can recall right off hand. I’ve only ever done the 1st and 3rd legs. I was talked into it by some running friends the first time and, while hard, was truly a great experience so I laced up my shoes and did it again and again.

When do you start training for this race?  How much of the course itself do you incorporate into your training?  How often do you incorporate the Dome into your training?

When I ran I ran all year round, for probably about 10 yrs. (I swim, cycle and yoga now). I incorporated parts of the course from time to time into my training, maybe once a month on average. I never ran to the Dome – rode horses to it and skied fairly high up but that’s it. I’m assuming driving doesn’t count!

What are your key workouts in preparation for this race?

Distance mainly – really building endurance and “active recovery” (recovery while still under load). And I did some interval work as well.

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

While the people are what brought me into it, I must say that my favorite part is the fall in Alaska. And even though I no longer live in Fairbanks every year at Equinox time I get to wishing I was there for the marathon.

What’s your favorite part of the course? Your least favorite part?

My favorite part of the course I discovered the last year I did it, the only time I’ve ever run the 3rd leg, which is the part after the Chute coming down from Ester. So pretty.  My least favorite part is easily the part around Ballaine Lake. It’s kind of dull.

Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race. Describe the worst.

It’s really hard to say what my best moment was – but the first year when I ran it with my friend Shawn (sp?) was really awesome. We’d been friends a long time – it was fun to reconnect and do this thing with him. He talked me into it, turns out I loved it!

My worst moment was finishing the 3rd leg – I was really in bad shape (sick or something), I remember it was all I could do to finish, I felt so horrible. And then went on to feel horrible for days.

Do you consider yourself a competitive runner? What are your running goals/fitness goals?

I am no longer a competitive runner, never really was. Just enjoyed it for a time. And now I do yoga, swim and cycle, which I’m quasi-competitive at.

What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

Make sure you run a lot – really prepare so that you can enjoy it. And run parts of the course so that you have an idea what’s in store. It’s not an easy route, nothing you can really just “toss off” lightly.

Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in this race?

Yes, the year I ran the 3rd leg I should’ve run the Chute more, more downhill routes. Although looking back at how sick I was and knowing I’d run down Chena for a month I’m still wondering if that was the problem. However, I’ve never been efficient at downhills and even more practice would not have hurt.

Any plans on participating in the Equinox this year? This race has been described as one of the most grueling marathons in the country!  What keeps you motivated to participate in this event?

I do not have any plans to participate this year – but I it were at all possible I would.  It kind of gets in your blood, I guess.  Really, it’s a wonderful experience!


Jane Lanford

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you participated in the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra?  How many times?

Since we moved to Fairbanks in 1993, I’ve run the marathon 14 times and the relay 3 times.  I’d love to do the ultra if it was on a different day so I could still do the marathon, too!

When do you start training for this race?  How much of the course itself do you incorporate into your training?  How often do you incorporate the Dome into your training?

My running training is year-round.  Those of us who live here are fortunate to be able to train on pieces of the course whenever we want (mostly; not on the ski trails in winter!), and it has such variety that I often incorporate part of the course into whatever training run I’m doing.  I make myself do the Dome a few times throughout the year – I do hill training because it’s good for me, not because I like it. :)

What are your key workouts in preparation for this race?

As with any marathon, it’s the long runs.  And being able to do them on the actual course is a real bonus.  One of the best is the 21.6-mile long run that consists of the entire Equinox course except the out-and-back.

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

Its toughness and uniqueness – the variety of terrain, the location in Fairbanks, the camaraderie of participants, its long history.

What’s your favorite part of the course? Your least favorite part?

Favorite:  I love the downhills!  Well, except the chute is a bit extreme.  But from the bottom of the chute down the alder trail is the best.  And I love to fly down Henderson Road to its intersection with Goldhill Road.

Least favorite:  I could say climbing the Dome, but the out-and-back is worse than that, but the hills in the last mile are the worst!

Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race. Describe the worst.

Best serendipitous moment:  Looking skyward at the right moment (at the top of the out-and-back) to see Denali in all its glory.  Best competitive moment:  Being in the women’s lead at Mile 24-1/2 (2003).

Worst moment:  Hm, not sure.  Maybe when I fell in the out-and-back in a year I was rather slow anyway.  Except that it made me mad and determined to finish as best I could.  Worst competitive moment:  Deciding not to run the 2006 marathon (I did the relay instead), and finding out the night before the race that many of my usual competitors also weren’t running.

Do you consider yourself a competitive runner? What are your running goals/fitness goals?

Oh, yes, much as the grass is always greener on the other side and I envy those who can stop and smell the flowers … I’m competitive.  With the clock, with myself, with other runners (particularly females in my age group and females in general).  I hope to keep running age-group competitively as long as I can.  I hope I can gracefully find some other goals if/when that is no longer possible.

What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

Oh, I’ve talked about this for two hours non-stop to those who take the course tour the day before the race.  And you want a succinct statement here?  OK … one of my key points, assuming the runner is in marathon shape, is not to kill yourself getting up Ester Dome and doing the out-and-back.  You’ve still got 9 miles to go, and even though gravity is going to help, it’s lots more fun if you’ve got something left in the tank.  Also feed your tank.  This marathon takes tons of energy, and you need to take in Gu, Powerade, or whatever fuel your body can handle.

Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in this race?

In my early Equinoxes, I didn’t know how to pace myself up Ester Dome.  One year in particular, I tried to stay with folks who were faster than me on hills, and I was dead by Mile 13.  Hence my advice in the previous question.  Also, one year I nearly didn’t finish because I didn’t eat along the way.  Hence my second bit of advice above.

Any plans on participating in the Equinox this year? This race has been described as one of the most grueling marathons in the country!  What keeps you motivated to participate in this event?

Lord willing and the creek don’t rise, I’m doing the marathon again!  Re: my competitiveness, described above.  Can’t escape it, might as well feed it.  Thanks to Estle’s excellent stats, we have the year-by-year age records, and those are very motivating to me. :)  Besides, it’s my hometown marathon.  As long as I can still run marathons, how can I not do it?



Jane LeBlond

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you ran the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra? How many times?

Full 5, relay 2, ultra 0 

How do you train for this race?  When do you start training?  May  Do you mostly run the course during the summer and run on trails?  No  How often do you incorporate the Dome into your runs? Rarely

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

Time of year, spectators

What’s your favorite part of the course?  Your least favorite part?

Favorite – powerline cut between miles 22-23, least favorite – out and back
 
Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race.  Describe the worst.

Best – running the final 2 miles and having friends ride with me on their bikes to the finish. Least – getting cold in the fog on top of Ester Dome and wanting to drop out.
 
Do you consider yourself a competitive runner?  What are your running goals/fitness goals?

Yes. Ummmm, always changing.
 
What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

Don’t set time goals. Just do it to finish.
 
Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in this race?

Training too much on Ester Dome and being burned out by race day.
 
Any plans on running the race this year?  Why do you participate in this race?  What keeps you motivated?

Never say never!


Ken Leary

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you ran the full marathon, the relay and/or the ultra?  How many times?

Full 8, relay 1, ultra 0 

How do you train for this race? Cross training with biking and roller skiing.  When do you start training? Trains all year  Do you mostly run the course the summer and on the trails? Yes, but mostly other trails.  How often do you incorporate the Dome into your runs? Occasionally

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

The Dome
 
What’s your favorite part of the course?  Your least favorite part?

Favorite part – Ester Dome. Least favorite – powerline trail between miles 22-23.
 
Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race.  Describe the worst.

Best – finishing. Worst – Bonking at 20 miles in 1969 (in the 7th grade).
 
Do you consider yourself a competitive runner?  What are your running goals/fitness goals?

Not a competitive runner. Don’t have any specific running goals. Do it to stay fit for ski season.
 
What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to this race?

Join the running groups to train on the course.
 
Have you made any big training errors, or race day flubs that adversely affected your enjoyment or time in this race?

Not eating enough during the race and bonking.
 
Any plans on running the race this year?  Why do you participate in this race?  What keeps you motivated?

Not running it this year. Ski season keeps me motivated to stay fit. (and my lovely wife).


Wendi Lyons

Describe your experience with the Equinox.  Have you ran the full marathon, the relay, and/or the ultra?  How many times?

The relay and the full. Once each.

How do you train for this race and when do you start training?

April or May

Do you mostly run the course during the summer and on the Equinox trails?

Yes

How often do you incorporate the Dome into your runs?

When I ran the full marathon, I only ran on the Dome a few times in training (see #7 for training tips below)

What’s your favorite thing about this race?

For many runners, the Equinox signifies the end of the running season in Fairbanks.  I liked the closure it gave plus the sense of accomplishment of finishing such a tough race!  Oh and I think the trails make this a very special marathon.

What’s your favorite part of the course?  Your least favorite part?

Favorite:  first 7 miles

Least Favorite:  the Chute!

Describe the best moment you’ve experienced during this race.  Describe the worst.

Worst:  Realizing at mile 7 that my nagging IT Band pain was going to seriously impair me for the rest of the race.

Best:    Deciding about mile 8 to jettison my goals I had set for myself and just finish!  After that I ran/walked a good portion of the rest of the race and thoroughly enjoyed myself.

Do you consider yourself a competitive runner?  What are your running goals?

Not a competitive runner.  Actually, I’m taking a break from running due to injuries.

What’s the best advice or training tips you can share with others who are new to the race?

I would say to include the Dome in your training regularly. Fitnesswise, I was fine for the Dome but my joints and tendons couldn’t take the steep slopes.

Any plans on running the race this year?  What keeps you motivated to participate in this race?

No, we’ll be out of town.   But I must say that even though I only ran the full marathon once, I trained for it for about 5 years. Each year I was motivated by the challenge of the Equinox!


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